The position on working hours for NSAs is that there are no nationally set working hours for full-time SNAs. In this respect, the contractual position regarding the working hours of the SNAs is defined in their employment contracts agreed with the school management authorities and the competent trade unions representing the SNAs (FÓRSA and SIPTU) before their introduction in 2005. The work week of SNAs is defined in paragraph 2.5 of their contract as follows: “You must take normal lessons, including breaks, as well as before and after school to help prepare and clean classrooms, welcome and distribute children, etc. Hours of work during the semester period are normally between [xxxx] and [xxxx] on a daily basis. Article 2.5 of the SNA contract stipulates that breaks are in accordance with the Working Time Act 1997. However, with regard to the question of when breaks can be taken, the contract states that the director will have a margin of appreciation, a practical consideration with which we have no difficulty. • How is compensation calculated for part-time hours?• Notice periods• Committee appointments• Travel: are you doing someone else`s job?• Standard contract for the 2018/2019 school year• Frequently asked questions about the SNA allocation• NCSE SNA review: key points and recommendations• Q&A: Comprehensive review of ncse special needs assistant program• Post-fragmentation• I was a full-time SNA, but my hours have been reduced. Am I entitled to severance pay? What does that mean? In practice, this means that if an SCN starts working at 9:00.m, he is entitled to a 15-minute break at 1:30.m. However, the exact time of the breaks must be decided on the spot, because the ultimate discretion as to the beginning of a break belongs to the principal. The position on working hours for NSAs is that there are no nationally set working hours for full-time SNAs. In this respect, the contractual position regarding the working hours of the SNAs is defined in their employment contracts agreed with the school management authorities and the competent trade unions representing the SNAs (FÓRSA and SIPTU) before their introduction in 2005. The work week of SNAs is defined in paragraph 2.5 of their contract as follows: “You must take normal lessons, including breaks, as well as before and after school to help prepare and clean classrooms, welcome and distribute children, etc.

Hours of work during the semester period are normally between [xxxx] and [xxxx] on a daily basis. This model contract has been designed to be flexible in order to adapt to the different range of working hours in all schools, including primary, post-school and special schools. No fixed time has been agreed, but full-time SNAs are expected to work during normal school hours in the school where they work and be available for a certain period of time before and after school to assist in the reception and distribution of children, the preparation and tidying up of classrooms, etc. These schedules are set by the local school management and vary from school to school depending on the requirements of the school. In addition, all ANS had to be available at the beginning and end of each school year for a series of days, which could not exceed a total of 12. As part of the Croke Park agreement, it was agreed to introduce greater flexibility for the use of these 12 days. These 12 days now correspond to 72 hours (prorated to part-time ANS), which must be used by schools as a bank of overtime and provided outside normal school hours and/or the normal school year. This employment contract is supplemented by all the relevant circulars of the Department of Special Assistants, which define the standard conditions of employment for the SNAs. These circulars will be amended from time to time by the Minister of Education and Qualifications and new circulars will be issued. Section 2.5 of the SNA Agreement can be found here. Members should note that this is the only agreed contract.

Members should contact their branch or organizer in Fórsa if they are aware of an alternative contract or alternative contract formulations. This model contract has been designed to be flexible in order to adapt to the different range of working hours in all schools, including primary, post-school and special schools. No fixed time has been agreed, but full-time SNAs are expected to work during normal school hours in the school where they work and be available for a certain period of time before and after school to assist in the reception and distribution of children, the preparation and tidying up of classrooms, etc. These schedules are set by the local school management and vary from school to school depending on the requirements of the school. Does an SNA have a supervisory function? Responsibility for supervision cannot be delegated to THE NSS. This is clarified in Circular 30/2014, which confirms that supervision is a responsibility of a teacher and not of an SCN. However, it is part of the role of the SCN to assist teachers with supervision, but in general, an SCN cannot retain exclusive control of a classroom or playground. Schedule 1 of the ANS contract states: “Assist teachers in supervising students during gatherings, recreation, and classroom distraction for any reason.” This means that if a teacher is present and supervises, an SCN can help.

However, an SNA cannot supervise itself. It is not part of their contract. There are very few circumstances in which a school can bring an action to allow an SNA to supervise. It is particularly important to note that the Ministry of Education and Qualifications has an alternative system in which a teacher is absent. There are no circumstances in which, in the absence of a teacher, an SCN should be expected to take control of a class. SNA Contractual Issues: ArchivesSince April, we have been publishing a special segment that focuses on the contractual issues faced by SNAs. Designed and written by Deputy Secretary General Seán Carabini, it has proven to be one of the most popular elements of the “Education” newsletter. We have archived all of these items for easy access and will publish an updated archive in each future issue of the newsletter. If you have any SNA contract issues that you would like to see addressed in the newsletter, please contact info@forsa.ie. Please indicate in the section “Questions relating to SAO contracts for the newsletter”. In addition, the contract for special assistants in post-primary education (link below) explicitly requires SNAs to be required to work on exams and other appropriate work, including training, in June. This was agreed with the unions representing the SNA (FÓRSA and SIPTU) when the contract was drafted in 2005.

This condition of service imposes a clear obligation and obligation on the SCN to be present at its workplace and to be available for work in June. In addition, the contract for special assistants in post-primary education (link below) explicitly requires SNAs to be obliged to work on exams in June and to do appropriate work for the class, including training. This was agreed with the unions representing the SNA (FÓRSA and SIPTU) when the contract was drafted in 2005. This condition of service imposes a clear obligation and obligation on the SCN to be present at its workplace and to be available for work in June. It is up to the school administration as the employer to determine the exact work to be performed by the SNAs during the month of June. The use of this period is not only for examination or training purposes, although these are two of the purposes for which working time can be used. Link to the SNA employment contract for the post-primary sector: Circular of the Ministry of Education and Skills SCN 12/05 (Post-Primary) www.education.ie/en/Circulars-and-Forms/Active-Circulars/sna12_05.pdf This employment contract is supplemented by all relevant circulars of the Ministry of Special Assistants listing the standard conditions of employment for SNAs. These circulars will be amended from time to time by the Minister of Education and Qualifications and new circulars will be issued. We list examples of these unacceptable practices. This list is not exhaustive. We will add to this if we discover other unacceptable and inappropriate practices.

Unacceptable practices identified so far include:1. Gardening2. Toilet cleaning3. Work at the front desk4. Road traffic5. Rolling and shredding for the whole school6. Paint the classroom7. Tea/coffee for teachers and parents during meetings8. Barcode of all school books9.

Clean up the library10. Building maintenance11. Window cleaning12. Car cleaning13. Cleaning and wiping the floor14. Homework Club15. Cover of the book16. Cleaning17. Administrative/clerical work (any work that would take away work from a school secretary or that would normally be performed by a school secretary, including general classification and shredding of the school)18. Breakfast clubs19.

Clean the lockers20. Photocopy for the entire school population21. Summer camps22. Music camps23. Sportlager24. . . .